The following was originally published in Enough-ism: This Minimalist Wants More and the Enough-ism Podcast.

In 1839, Prussian physicist and meteorologist, Henrich Wilhelm Dove, performed a bizarre experiment. A subject stood in a room. Dove placed a tuning fork on each of their ears. Then, Dove vibrated each tuning fork to a different sound frequency. Next, something funky happened. Subjects perceived a totally different sound than what was being played. It sounded like a low, buzzing hum. This sound was the difference between two frequencies — the space between the noise.

In 1973, biophysicist Dr. Gerald Oster researched Dove’s theory. He found binaural beats — even ones played so low the human ear couldn’t detect them — helped improve focus, memory, and pain. There was a possible clinical connection between binaural beats and healing. …


The Lost Art of Shopping with Intention

The following was originally published in Enough-ism: This Minimalist Wants More and on the Enough-ism Podcast.

Listen to the podcast version of this article here.

You may think the whole world is busy right now hunting for killer Black Friday sales. Not quite. Most people this year won’t open their wallets on Black Friday at all. Fifty-nine percent of nearly 2,500 survey respondents, according to a Huffington Post readers’ poll, when asked, “Do you plan on shopping on Black Friday?” responded with, “No way! That’s for suckers.”

About one in four respondents, or 23 percent, said they’d spend money, but only online. One in 10 said they’d decide at the last minute if they were going to drop any dough. The remainder — eight percent — said they’d absolutely be (physically) shopping on Black Friday. …


Meditation (in Hibernation) Series: Part 1

The following guided meditation was originally published in Enough-ism: This Minimalist Wants More and on the Enough-ism Podcast.

This meditation aims to help you deal with pain, anxiety, trauma, daily stress, ongoing emotional fatigue, and negative self-talk by increasing your self-awareness and self-love. If you’re feeling the quarantine blues hard today, let this short meditation be but a small beacon of light to help pull you out of gloom and hopelessness and into joy and serenity, no matter where you are, physically or mentally.

Listen to this guided meditation on YouTube.

You find yourself standing alone on a beautiful beach. You’re staring at the ocean. The wind is blowing gently. There’s a beautiful horizon that expands out into eternity. There is no one there with you except for yourself and your own thoughts. …


Interview with Mindfulness Expert, Dr. Gail Gazelle

The following was originally published in Enough-ism: This Minimalist Wants More and on the Enough-ism Podcast.

Dr. Gail Gazelle, author of Everyday Resilience: A Practical Guide to Build Inner Strength and Weather Life’s Challenges, is a fascinating triple threat: Harvard Medical School professor, former hospice physician, and certified mindfulness teacher.

As host of the mindfulness and minimalism podcast Enough-ism, I interviewed Dr. …


There’s a Silver Lining in Society’s Collective Slow-Down

The following was originally published in Enough-ism: This Minimalist Wants More and the Enough-ism Podcast.

Let’s begin with two little words: “social distancing.” This phrase first appeared online around 20 years ago (in 2003 to be exact). The World Health Organization has used a very similar phrase you may have also heard called “physical distancing.” Obviously, social versus physical have very different connotations. (That being said, the social often leads to the physical…) But, regardless, both phrases boil down to our basic ability and desire to stay away from people — but also from things.

Many people, including those who aren’t minimalists by any stretch of the imagination, are experiencing their first foray into minimalism during the pandemic, just because of how the world is changing and evolving more in that direction. …


Getting Back to What Makes Humans Human

The following was originally published in Enough-ism: This Minimalist Wants More and on the Enough-ism Podcast.

Buddhist monks are perhaps some of the original minimalists. And social distancers. They have been historically only allowed to possess eight items.
According to the Pali Canon of the Theravada School of Buddhism’s website and madana.org, they are:

1. an inner robe

2. an outer robe

3. another robe to offer protection if the first two robes don’t do their job protecting you from the weather (perhaps it’s amazing that it’s only eight items and three of them are essentially the same item)

4. a bowl to beg…


If you’re reading these words, you probably have an interest in minimalism. Good timing.

The following was originally published in Enough-ism: This Minimalist Wants More and on the Enough-ism Podcast.

If you’re reading these very words, you probably have an interest in minimalism. Good timing, by the way. The average American has 300,000 items, according to the LA Times. One in ten Americans, according to The New York Times, rents a storage unit. The average American woman, according to Forbes, owns one outfit for every day of the month.

So, minimalists — those who willingly get their belongings down to nearly nada amidst a consumerist (buy! buy! buy!) society — must have it easy, right? They can easily count and itemize all their things, they don’t pay to store stuff they don’t use or need, but, hey, they probably do laundry like every day, right? Well, the term “minimalist” might conjure up some stereotypes, for sure. Immediate images of, maybe, a soul-searching, semi-wannabe hipster wearing head-to-toe black with nothing but a passport and a glimmer in his eye to spend life as a digital nomad on a never-ending holiday, come to mind. …

About

Enough-ism Podcast

This minimalist wants more. | IAmEnoughism.com

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store